Amazing Cakes #13: Swiss Roll

I’ve been so behind with my blog posts recently. One day I’d like to have the time to write up about what I’ve made on the day it was actually made. Since we went into the second lockdown (though I can’t really call it that as I don’t think anything has closed where I live, except the pub and local cafes!) I’ve been working virtually full time and haven’t had much time for baking over the last couple of weeks. On the day after Boris’ announcement, it was business as usual for us at home. Loads of jobs to catch up on and a nice Sunday roast to cook, followed by some sort of dessert or cake for pudding.

I was looking through my Amazing Cakes From The Great British Bake Off book and was thinking what would make a great pudding. I thought about a Swiss Roll as I can’t believe I’ve never made one before. They look so fiddly and awkward to handle that I’ve thought I can’t be bothered with all that effort.

This recipe for a Swiss Roll is a quick bake and is made in just ten minutes. As a whisked and fatless sponge it doesn’t last long but then again anything with cream inside never lasts long in our house!

I didn’t have a special Swiss Roll tin for the bake but I used a shallow baking tray which usually ends up being my roast potato baking tray as it was the same size. I lined it carefully with some baking paper. You need quite a bit of baking paper for this bake as you need an extra piece to help you roll up the Swiss Roll when it has baked.

I got started on the sponge part just before lunchtime on the Sunday after I had waded through a huge pile of ironing. A baking session with music playing in the background is always my spur to get the chores done. To begin with, I whisked eggs and sugar together until the mixture was thick and like a mousse. It took a while to get the ribbon trail hanging down from the whisk!

I used the spare sheet of baking paper to sift the flour and salt on it. I then took half of the flour off it and folded it into the whisked egg mixture with a large metal spoon. Then I added the other half of the flour and did the same.

The mixture was then poured into the prepared tin. I had pre-heated my oven to 200oC fan which seemed very high but that was what the recipe stated. I was meant to put the sponge in for 9-10 minutes but after 8 minutes it looked burnt and was coming away from the sides of the tin. I hope it wasn’t because the oven was too hot!

Feeling disappointed and deflated, I sprinkled caster sugar onto the spare baking sheet and then turned the sponge onto it. Hoping the caster sugar would cover up the mistakes and any cracks, I was careful to roll it up until it was completely cool.

I was thinking about what filling to put in the Swiss Roll and thought ooh great I’ve got some lemon curd! I didn’t realise that there wasn’t enough to spread on even half of the roll. Same with some blackberry jam. In the end it became a hybrid lemon-blackberry combo with far more whipped cream than jam.

I know when I bake sometimes things do look like the pictures in the recipe book but the same can’t be said of this recipe! I couldn’t see any jam when I rolled up the Swiss Roll. All I could see was the cream and it didn’t look that pretty. This was a true case of it tastes better than it looks!

The Swiss Roll was ready before I had even started on the roast chicken dinner we were planning on eating. I felt hungry and ended up cutting off a piece to eat. It tasted lovely and definitely not burnt!

Next time I make a Swiss Roll I’ll check if the oven temperature really should be 200oC even for a fan oven or maybe I’ll reduce the baking time. It was true that the cake should have been eaten on the day it was made, we had all had a piece but the following day it tasted stale.

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx

Amazing Cakes #7: Victoria Sponge

I know I’ve published a blog post somewhere about a good old Vicky Sponge but I wanted to try out the Amazing Cakes’ version last Monday.

It was my day off work and I walked down to my local post office to post a few parcels of some hand crocheted and knitted baby blankets I sell. This walk took me twice as long as my local post office is 1 1/2 miles away and I was trying to walk the dog and carry parcels at the same time. On the way back my shopping bag contained some Stork and some fresh Longley Farm thick Jersey double cream. I kept thinking ooh that would go nicely in the middle of a Victoria sponge. We walked back and I sat eating some lunch quickly so I could get on with my jobs and then the all important baking!

In the Amazing Cakes book the quantities for butter/ margarine, caster sugar and flour are the same as they are in all Victoria sponge recipes. This version asked for 4 eggs but when I weighed them only 3 eggs weighed the total as the separate quantities of 200g. As I always weigh the eggs to match the weight of the other ingredients, I only used three eggs. This worked well and I also used the creaming method.

I had invested in some new 20cm or 8″ diameter cake tins a few weeks ago as my previous ones had got very scratched. They had been used a lot though and I worked out I had had them since about 2002! My new ones are Mary Berry endorsed ones from Lakeland and I can’t recommend them enough. I also treated myself to her traybake tin and square tin at the same time and they are fantastic. This was the first time I had got round to using the sandwich tins and I was impressed with the result.

Usually you think of Victoria Sponges as being filled with strawberry or raspberry jam but I thought I’d give mine a seasonal twist and used some gorgeous Bramble and Apple jam I buy when we go on holiday to the Isle of Arran. I know I’m always banging on about going to the Isle of Arran but that’s where we have been for our last two holidays (last October half term and this September) and there is a wonderful selection of food produce I buy each time we go there. The Bramble And Apple Jam being one of them made by Arran Fine Foods though they also make other wonderful preserves and chutneys.

When Mr S got in from work he said “More baking!” as I also managed to bake some Coconut Macaroons on the same afternoon. He didn’t complain when he got a piece of cake with his cup of tea before I started getting our dinner ready.

The remains of the Victoria Sponge got eaten throughout the rest of last week as on Wednesday night we found out we had to self isolate for two weeks.

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx

Sultana Scones- My Favourite Recipe

I’ve been meaning to write this blog post up for ages. Having a bit more time being in lockdown has given me the time to add more things on the blog. Scone’s have always been one of my favourites. You can’t beat a fresh, homemade scone. One of the things I am really looking forward to doing when cafes and restaurants have opened up again is to meet up with one of my besties, Sharon. We love to put the world to rights and have a good old catch up over a cream scone and a cuppa at Fodder on the outskirts of Harrogate.

This scone recipe works for me every time. I always put dried fruit in mine but if you don’t like it, just leave it out. Make sure you have lots of clotted or whipped cream alongside a good quality jam to serve with it. The last time I baked scones I served them with some Blackcurrant and Sloe Gin Jam which my mum had bought for me when she visited a National Trust property.

To also make the perfect scone, I have a few tips which have helped me over the years.

Remember not to overcook the scones or they will become heavy. You are looking for a soft and light texture here. When you are forming the dough, use a round bladed or palette knife to bring it together a bit like you do with pastry. Try not to handle the dough too much. I do use a rolling pin to flatten out the dough, but I don’t roll the dough much. It’s more like a light pressing. When putting the cutter into the dough, don’t twist it or it distorts the shape of the scone.

My Favourite Sultana Scone Recipe

Makes 12 scones.

You need two baking trays lined with non- stick baking paper. I use a medium sized cutter for my scones. I think the one I use is a 5cm one. Some people prefer plain edges, some fluted. With me, I read somewhere that you use a plain edge for sweet scones and a fluted one for savoury. I must admit I’ve done both, depending on what I fancy using at the time.

Ingredients:

125g butter

450g self raising flour

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

50g caster sugar

100g sultanas or raisins (optional)

1 medium free range egg, beaten

Whole milk to mix

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 190oC/ Fan 170oC/ 375oF/Gas 5.
  2. Weigh out all your ingredients and cut your butter into small cubes.
  3. Rub the butter into the flour with your fingertips until the mixture looks like breadcrumbs.
  4. Add the salt, bicarbonate of soda and the sugar and stir through carefully.
  5. Stir in the sultanas if you are using them.
  6. Pour in the beaten egg and work the dough together. You might need to add a few drops of milk as well.
  7. Sprinkle some flour on your worktop as well as on your rolling pin. Then roll or pat the dough lightly. The dough should be about 1.5cm thick. Cut into rounds. Gather up the remaining dough and re-roll carefully taking care not to overwork the dough. Cut more rounds until you have used the dough up.
  8. Put the scones onto your prepared baking sheets. I usually have two sheets with six scones on.
  9. Bake in the oven for 12-15 minutes.
  10. Allow to cool on a wire rack but serve as soon as you can, the fresher the better!

You can choose whether you want to use a plain or a fluted cutter.

You can’t beat scones served with jam and whipped cream. I love clotted cream as well when I can get hold of it.

I have also baked this recipe as a plain scone as seen in the photo above. This was taken at a family birthday afternoon tea last year and the scones were made without fruit in.

Let me know if you try my recipe and what you think about it.

Stay safe.

Happy Baking

Love Sam xx

Icelandic Marriage Cake.

Whenever I go on holiday I like to find out if there are any traditional local cakes either to try  or to recreate at home.  Last month we went to Iceland for four days as a stopover on our way to Canada.  I didn’t eat any cake or sample any Icelandic baking but was curious to know if Iceland has any traditional cake recipes.

On our flight back from Edmonton to Keflavik flying with IcelandAir I was looking through the menu card for the inflight meals and snacks.  They were offering what looked like a flapjack bar with jam in the middle called a Marriage Cake.  Although I didn’t eat one, I thought I’d Google it when I got home and see if I could make one myself.

Looking up about the marriage cake was interesting, there were lots of recipes around but nothing mentioned the origins of it and why it was called marriage cake. Maybe in years gone by it might have been one of the first things a newly married wife would bake for her husband to please him. It seemed quite an easy recipe so, maybe if the new wife wasn’t used to cooking.  I don’t know.  Maybe it contains aphrodisiacs?!!  Anyway, most recipes I came across had a few things in common. They tended to be baked in a circular cake tin with a crumble type base. There would be a layer of mixed raspberry jam with rhubarb, then the remains of the crumble mixture would be sprinkled on top.

Eventually I came across this recipe on the Delicious Magazine website:

http://www.deliciousmagazine.co.uk/recipes/happy-marriage-cake/

The recipe uses a mixture of rhubarb and strawberry jam in the filling. I didn’t have any of that jam in my cupboard, although Mr SmartCookieSam sometimes loves MacKays Rhubarb and Ginger Jam on his toast for breakfast. I used some Bonne Maman Blueberry Jam instead. It wouldn’t have been that authentic but I didn’t want to go out buying more jam when I had plenty in the cupboard.

I chose to bake the Marriage Cake in a square tin instead of in the circular loose bottom tin like other recipes suggested. I wanted it to be cut in bars instead of slices so I used a tin I use a lot for when I bake brownies and shortbread. To prepare the tin, I greased it with some Wilton Cake Release, which I swear by.

In a large mixing bowl I creamed together some softened butter and light brown muscovado sugar. I thought that if this was meant to be a crumble type mixture then you would need to rub the butter into the dry ingredients. Instead this sounded more like baking biscuits! I followed the recipe anyway and then added a beaten egg to the creamed mixture. Once this was added in, then I put in some plain flour, bicarbonate of soda and some porridge oats. This did look more like a cookie dough at the end of it.

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Two thirds of the crumble mixture was pressed into the tin to form the marriage cake’s base.

The middle of the cake was made up of blueberry jam, although this was a bit runny!
The final layer was the topping which was the last third of the crumble mixture. Very rustic looking but it was all in the taste.
The Marriage Cake cooling on the rack before being cut into bars,
Cut into 12 bars, the Marriage cake was a little too sweet for me.

 On the day that I baked the Marriage Cake I was in a funny mood.  The weather was lousy and every time I tried to start something I would get interrupted.  Not by my kids, though, they were both out at the time but by cold callers phoning!  Then as soon as I got the cold caller off the phone,  the phone went again.  The warmth of my kitchen is my sanctuary, where I go to relax and unwind.  It was having the opposite effect today.  Soon though, the delicious smell wafted through the house from my oven.  I was meant to be dieting but with the rubbish weather I felt like I needed something full of carbs. I could hardly wait for them to cool down.

To be honest I was a little bit disappointed.  The blueberry jam made the Marriage Bars far too sweet. Maybe if I had used the rhubarb jam, which is more tart then it wouldn’t have been so sickly.  I took a bite out of one of the bars and that was all I had.  This is unheard of for me, I began to wonder if I was ill! Me finding something too sweet?  I left the bars out on the worktop and when my kids came back in they had one each.  Funny how they would usually turn their noses up at most things but they enjoyed these.

What was so funny was that I posted a photo of the bars on Facebook later and then put the bars into a plastic tub in the fridge.  Mr SmartCookieSam who only goes on Facebook to spy on me and the kids saw the post about the Marriage Cakes  a couple of days later and commented “I haven’t seen these!” Funny how the man I’m married to was the only one  who hadn’t seen the cakes. I told him to look in the fridge but found a completely empty box!  My kids never wash out empty boxes, they just leave them there for me to clean! Such is life!

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx

Eton Mess Cake- The Clandestine Cake Club A Year Of Cake Bakealong June 2016.

I’m a member of the internationally renowned Clandestine Cake Club and regularly go along to local events in Yorkshire. I’ve been a member for over 3 years now and have made a lot of friends through the club. We take a cake each along to the event and try tiny pieces of each other’s cakes. If we can’t eat much, we take cake home at the end to share with family or work colleagues. Last year I was excited to hear that two of my recipes were to be published in the second Clandestine Cake Club cookbook “A Year Of Cake”. My Welsh Honey and Camomile Bara Brith and Mojito and Coconut Tres Leches Cake recipes were featured in the book, much to my surprise but happiness!

Lots of yummy recipes are featured in the book including ones created by friends.  One such recipe I’ve been desperate to have a go at baking is the one my friend Clare submitted for the book, her take on a British classic pudding in cake form- Eton Mess.  Containing some of my favourite pudding ingredients, such as meringue, strawberries and raspberries mixed with cream. Clare’s cake uses buttercream and jam to sandwich a traditional Victoria sponge together and the Eton Mess part of the cake is it’s photogenic topping. Clare’s recipe also contains another ingredient I love which works perfectly with strawberries and raspberries, a luscious addition of white chocolate chunks. 

Last Saturday afternoon I was at home for once. It’s been a crazy few weeks with every weekend spoken for and work has been chaotic. Baking was my chance to unwind and enjoy a bit of “me time”. I wanted to bake a cake to celebrate my daughter passing her college course. She is now a qualified make up artist and is off to uni to study media makeup and prosthetics in September. We are all very proud of her as she aims to follow her dream. Baking cakes of course is one of my ways of congratulating her! Everyone at home loves pavlova and cake so I knew the Eton Mess cake would be a big hit.

To bake the cake I started off by baking the sponge part. This is done in the usual way that you make a Victoria sponge and it wasn’t long before I was creaming butter and sugar together with my handheld electric mixer. Clare suggests using margarine instead of butter so I used Pure Non Dairy spread which I swear by for baking sponges and cupcakes. It makes them very light. Then in went four eggs one by one which were beaten into the mixture. As I started to add some self raising flour and baking powder I realised I hadn’t got the cake tins out. My cake tin drawers in my kitchen are getting very messy and it takes me ages to sort through them to find the right size tin. I was annoyed that one of the tins had fallen down the back of the unit and got wedged between it and the drawer below. Hubby would say it was my own fault for having too many cake tins! I don’t agree! 

Finally having found the tins I was looking for I got them greased and the mixture in them ready to go in the oven. For once I remembered to set the timer and being as I have a fan oven I wanted to check them after 20-25 minutes. This is when I realise I’m not that good at multi tasking. I put some washing in the machine and another load out on the line. It took me ages to do this as there were loads of pairs of socks and pants to hang out! By the time I’d gone back inside I realised it was time for the cake to come out of the oven. Thankfully got it out just in time!

Now for the decoration part. For the cake topping I needed to make some mini meringues. I’ve only made meringues once or twice before, it’s something I’ve never really done a lot of. I always thought of them as being fiddly and complicated. But Clare’s way of whisking the egg whites until they are stiff then adding caster sugar a teaspoonful at a time was a great help to get the right consistency. I have always tipped in the sugar and wondered why I couldn’t get them to keep the egg whites stiff enough. Also, to add into the meringue mixture you mix in some cornflour and white wine vinegar. I was impressed with my shiny meringue mixture and then got my baking trays ready. I prepared up my piping bag and my large star nozzle. The meringue piped easily onto the trays and there was more than enough to go on the cake as well as having some left over.

I was really impressed with how my meringue stars turned out.
There were lots of leftover meringue stars once I’d decorated the cake.

Now for the cake assembling and decorating time, the bit I was looking forward to the most. I decided to use whipped cream in place of buttercream in the recipe. I had a small pot of cream in the fridge which needed to be used up and I didn’t want to waste it. I whipped up the cream but there wasn’t enough to fill the middle of the cake along with some strawberry  jam. So instead the cream was just spread on the top of the cake with the jam in the middle. Once the cream was spread on I put meringue stars around the edge of the cake and filled the middle with raspberries, strawberries and white chocolate chunks.

View from the top- a heavenly combination of meringues, raspberries, strawberries, cream and white chocolate.
Ta-dah! A classic cake perfect for a summer celebration.
Lush meringue stars.
We didn’t get to eat a piece of the cake until the following day but it was worth the wait!
The cake got eaten over the next couple of days. By Wednesday it had all gone!
Although the cake had been baked on Saturday afternoon for my daughter, we didn’t actually get to enjoy some until the day after. My daughter had been working all day Saturday and went straight to a friends’ house to a party and sleepover. Then on Sunday morning she went straight to work and didn’t get to eat her cake until Sunday tea time. I kept the cake in the fridge due to the cream in it and it kept it fresh. An extremely popular cake all round and one I would love to bake again in the future.

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx

Mary Berry’s Classic Swiss Roll

It was Sunday lunchtime and that means a cake or a dessert in our house to follow the roast.  Once again I turned to my trusty Mary Berry’s Baking Bible to bake another recipe from my Cooking The Books Challenge.  Mary’s Swiss Roll is one of the recipes featured in her Classic Recipes chapter, along with a couple of variations.  As I have only ever made one fairly successful Swiss Roll in my life, I decided I needed a bit more practice.  When my daughter saw I was planning to bake a Swiss Roll she asked if she could do it.  As the one she made in her GCSE Catering Practical got an A* from her teacher I think she is definitely the Swiss Roll expert in our house.

So here’s how my daughter (with a tiny bit of help with one stage from me) made this utterly scrumptious bake!

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Whisking the eggs and sugar together.
The Swiss roll tray all lined and greased.
The Swiss roll tray all lined and greased.
Self raising flour was carefully folded into the whisked egg and sugar mixture.
Self raising flour was carefully folded into the whisked egg and sugar mixture.
Pouring the mixture into the prepared tin.
The mixture was spread about so that it reached all corners of the tin.
The mixture was spread about so that it reached all corners of the tin.

Once the cake had gone into the oven (my oven is a fan assisted electric one, so the temperature was 200oC) my daughter disappeared upstairs to do whatever teenagers do in the depths of their bedrooms.  As the cake was only going to be in the oven for about 10 minutes I didn’t dare leave the kitchen.  It seemed to bake very quickly.  Anyway, as soon as it was out of the oven I called my daughter and told her to come down.  She had got engrossed in something so I said I would take it out of the tin and do the trimming bits.  She could finish off the rest seeing as she wanted to do it in the first place!

Another piece of baking parchment bigger than the swiss roll was put on the worktop.  It was sprinkled liberally with caster sugar.
Another piece of baking parchment bigger than the swiss roll was put on the worktop. It was sprinkled liberally with caster sugar.
Here's the baked Swiss Roll just fresh out of the oven.
Here’s the baked Swiss Roll just fresh out of the oven.
After a little while the Swiss Roll was turned out of its tin and onto the sugared piece of baking parchment.  This would be used to help it be rolled up later!
After a little while the Swiss Roll was turned out of its tin and onto the sugared piece of baking parchment. This would be used to help it be rolled up later!
The Swiss Roll was trimmed to give it neat edges.
The Swiss Roll was trimmed to give it neat edges.
Then a scored line using a sharp knife was used about an inch from one short end of the cake.
Then a scored line using a sharp knife was used about an inch from one short end of the cake.

By this time my daughter had come back downstairs.  I wanted her to get finished with the Swiss Roll as I needed to get started on the rest of the dinner.

This was some homemade jam leftover from last week's Eton Mess which was great to go inside the Swiss Roll.
This was some homemade jam leftover from last week’s Eton Mess which was great to go inside the Swiss Roll.
My daughter spreads the jam onto the top of her Swiss Roll.
My daughter spreads the jam onto the top of her Swiss Roll.
Then, she whipped up some cream to go with the jam for the filling.
Then, she whipped up some cream to go with the jam for the filling.
Starting to spread the cream onto the top of the Swiss Roll!
Starting to spread the cream onto the top of the Swiss Roll!
Slapping it on!
Slapping it on!
My daughter expertly rolls up the Swiss Roll inside the sugared parchment.
My daughter expertly rolls up the Swiss Roll inside the sugared parchment.
Ta-dah! A very impressive, delicious and scrumptious Swiss Roll just asking to be eaten.
Ta-dah! A very impressive, delicious and scrumptious Swiss Roll just asking to be eaten.
We couldn't resist nabbing the end piece before dinner.
We couldn’t resist nabbing the end piece before dinner!!

Well I was totally amazed by this yummy bake and we were rather greedy over it.  Not only did I share the end piece with my daughter before dinner but I had another slice for pudding!  The following night my hubby finished it off.  It was just too scrumptious for words.

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx

Eton Mess

Now there’s two days until the end of the month and I have two recipes left to try out from Jo Wheatley’s A Passion For Baking as part of my Cooking The Books challenge for March 2014.  Today, being Mothers’ Day I wanted to make a scrummy dessert for our lunch.  I wanted something everyone in our house would eat and something not too heavy and sickly.  All of the desserts in Jo’s first book looked lovely and I want to try them all out eventually.  I chose Eton Mess because it meant I would have to try out making meringues, something which I haven’t really done. Normally I just buy the ready made meringue nests you get in the supermarkets, but Jo’s recipe would not only test my meringue skills but jam making ones too! I would have to make a strawberry jam like sauce, now jam making is something else I really struggle with.  I can never get it to set properly!

Late this morning I was also trying to make an Onion and Cheese Tart  for our lunch with the Eton Mess as the pudding.  The meringue was going to be the time consuming bit as they would be in the oven for an hour baking plus the time they had to stay in there after to cool down.  This was a bit of a pain as I needed the oven to bake the tart in.  I have a double oven range cooker but I only cook roasts in the other one. It was funny as I was trying to sort out the Eton Mess downstairs in my kitchen, my hubby was upstairs moaning at my kids for the mess in their bedrooms.  I give up!

Anyway, I was well out of it down in the kitchen and I got down to it straightaway. Here’s how I got on:

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I had to make the meringues first. Here, I am whisking up three egg whites until they held soft peaks.
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After that, the second stage was to add some caster sugar bit by bit to the egg whites. It took a long time to get the meringues stiff!

The meringues were a bit runnier than I expected but I managed to pipe them onto some baking parchment ready to pop in the oven.  They were baked for about an hour on a low temperature (of 100oC), then were left to cool down in the oven afterwards even when the oven was switched off.  This helped them to crisp up and set a little bit.

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Here are my finished meringues. They don’t look very pretty but then it didn’t matter as I was going to break them up in chunks anyway!

While the meringues were baking I got on with the jam.  Jo’s recipe mentions strawberries but being as strawberries aren’t in season at the moment I used a mixture of strawberries, raspberries and blueberries to make up the same quantity needed for the jam.  I got the pan to the boil first to get the sugar dissolved which was also in the pan, then the heat was turned down and cooked for another 15 to 20 minutes longer to thicken up. Once this had happened I set it aside to cool down until I was ready to assemble the pudding.

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Boiling the jam.
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Whipping double cream and half fat creme fraiche together.

When it was time to get the pudding ready I got out some double cream and half fat creme fraiche.  I’d had to use some of my double cream in the onion and cheese tart so there wasn’t enough to put on the Eton Mess!  You needed 600ml of double cream, I only had 350ml, so I added in a small tub of half fat creme fraiche I had in the fridge.  This was whipped up together with my  electric hand whisk.

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A huge bowlful of whipped cream and creme fraiche.

When it was ready I started to assemble the puddings.  I don’t have any tall sundae glasses so I used some tumblers.  The strawberry jam went in the bottom of the glasses first, with pieces of crushed meringue, cream with jam stirred through, followed by plain cream and finished with more meringue pieces. I’d forgotten to save some fruit to keep for the top of the puddings.

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My finished Eton Messes!
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Showing the crushed homemade meringues on top of the cake.

We all thoroughly enjoyed our puddings and they were very naughty but nice.  My hubby is convinced that Eton Mess has vanilla ice cream in it, I told him he was wrong! To me Eton Mess is like a pavlova but messed up! If he wants ice cream with it I suppose you could have a scoop of it on the side.  I couldn’t help him out there, we didn’t have any ice cream in to give him!

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx