Nostalgic Bakes from Paul Hollywood’s “A Baker’s Life”

The recent spate of snow days has made me want to stay in my warm kitchen and bake comfort food.  Never mind me trying to diet.  Forget that! When you feel cold and tired, all you want to do is to hibernate with a giant piece of flapjack in each hand!

I ended not being able to work for three days due to the snow last week but then again I wasn’t the only one.  Then again it gave me chance to catch up with jobs and to try out some recipes from Paul Hollywood’s latest book A Baker’s Life.  I had got it at Christmas last year and had my eye on several things I wanted to test out.

The book spans the five decades of Paul’s life so far from his childhood as the son of a baker in Merseyside right up to the present day as a judge on The Great British Bake Off.  Each chapter in the book concentrates on recipes from a certain time of life.  I wanted to start with the first chapter: Nostalgic Bakes from Paul’s early years.

There were loads of recipes to choose from, including traditional favourites that we would all remember from our own childhoods.  Some of the recipes are perfect for actually making with children, such as Cornflake Cakes and Jam Tarts.  As well as these, there were also recipes for bakes that your grandma or mum may have made in years gone by.  The first recipe in the book was actually called My Mum’s Ginger Biscuits.  I absolutely love ginger biscuits and they remind me of the Yorkshire Ginger Biscuits my Nana Margaret would buy.  She would never bake them as she was a walking disaster in the kitchen.  If she could buy it in Marks and Spencer’s food hall, she would have it and pass it off as her own.

Paul says in his recipe introduction: ” Not only are they a doddle to make, but they’ve got the right balance of being crispy and chewy.” The recipe was an old-fashioned melting method one, where the butter or margarine is melted in a saucepan on the hob with golden syrup and caster sugar. Then once the melted mixture was cooled enough to handle, then self raising flour and a beaten egg were added to the mixture.

The mixture was then gathered up into a ball and made into a dough.  I separated the dough into about 24 pieces and spaced them out carefully on lined baking trays.  I put two trays in the oven at a time and watched them like a hawk. They could easily burn quickly after about 10 minutes.

I always like my cookies on the chewy side and to be honest I would add tiny pieces of chopped stem ginger to the dough.  This version has the ginger flavour coming from ground ginger and wow, did my kitchen smell wonderful! I honestly don’t know how I managed to keep them from being scoffed instead of taking them into work.

When the biscuits were cooling down on the rack, I decided to have a go at another recipe from the Nostalgic Bakes chapter.  This time it was for a Tea Loaf.  I have baked countless tea loaves in my time, including my own version of a Welsh Bara Brith which recipe is featured in the second Clandestine Club Cookbook A Year Of Cake.  I can’t resist a slice of tea loaf, slathered in butter and with a cup of my beloved Yorkshire Tea.  The recipe doesn’t feature any spices or citrus fruit zest but is crammed full of raisins, sultanas and currants.  I did not have any currants but made up the difference in weight with extra sultanas and raisins.  The dried fruit had been previously soaked in some strong Yorkshire Tea and to this I added self raising flour, demerara sugar, milk and a beaten egg.

Once this was mixed up, I lined my 2 lb loaf tin with a special loaf tin liner and put it to bake in my fan oven.  I completely forgot that I also needed to bake some potato wedges to go along with the Cajun Chicken breasts cooking in the slow oven for our dinner that night.  So half way through the baking time I had to whip the oven door open and stuff the tray of wedges in on the shelf underneath the tea loaf.  Luckily they were both ready at the same time as I didn’t want the cake sinking.

I left the cake to cool on the side with the ginger biscuits and then took them along to work the following day.  I left them in the staff room and found that half the biscuits had gone along with a couple of slices of cake when I popped in at lunchtime before going home.

Next week I’m thinking of trying out some Millionaire’s Shortbread if I have time.

Happy Baking

Love Sam xx

Eccles Cakes.

 

A couple of weeks ago I tried my hand at Eccles Cakes for the very first time.
 
A few weeks ago when I was watching The Great British Bake Off my hubby said to me that a lot of bakes he finds far too sweet and sickly. As someone with a sweet tooth I found this difficult to understand. Although I do find as I’m getting older my taste buds are changing…

One bake hubby likes though are Eccles Cakes. A few weeks back he was tempted when our local Booths store had some on special offer in packs by the front entrance. He came home with some and was asking if they were easy to make. To be honest I didn’t know as I’d never made them before. I knew they were made with puff pastry, my nemesis in the kitchen. Why faff about all day making your own when you can use Jus Rol. Even Mary Berry says it’s ok, and if the First Lady of Baking says so then that’s fine by me. 

I’ve never had a thing for Eccles Cakes. I think it was because my Nana used to buy them from a local bakery and by the time we got to eat them they were always dry and stale. 

So, I thought as it was half term week and I’d have a little more time to play about, I’d have a go at some home made Eccles Cakes. Paul Hollywood has a recipe in his British Baking book and wait for it… lo and behold he says you can use ready made puff pastry to make them! What?! Couldn’t hear him saying that on Bake Off!

So, Jus Rol it was then. I’m far too busy to faff about making puff pastry. 

Paul’s recipe was very easy to follow and even had some step-by- step pictures and instructions to follow when making up the Eccles Cakes.

First I washed some currants, dried the, and then added them to a bowl with melted butter, caster sugar, some nutmeg and lemon zest. It was a delicious aroma and was very tempting to stick a teaspoon in and eat a few mouthfuls!

Next I rolled out my puff pastry on a lightly floured worktop and cut out rounds with a circular pastry cutter. Unfortunately I couldn’t find the one the right size, used an 8cm one instead of the 10cm one that Mr Hollywood suggested. After the rounds had been cut out, I spooned carefully the currant mixture in the middle of the pastry.  This was then finished off by brushing the rim of each Eccles cake with water then gathering up all the edges over the filling. I then pressed the gathered edges to seal the Eccles cakes and turned them face down on my lined baking tray.

I then flattened the top of the Eccles cakes with my hand and made 3 slits on the top of each one. They were then brushed with milk and put in the oven to bake for about 15-20 minutes.

I forgot to sprinkle the tops with caster sugar even though I’d put some out ready in my sugar dredger. They still looked ok though.

 

My Eccles Cakes came out a lot smaller than they should as I used the wrong size cutter.
  
My husband loved these Eccles Cakes .
 When they were warm out of the oven I took one to hubby with a cup of tea. He scoffs it down and asked for another one. They were smaller than the ones in the shop and although I’d only baked 12 and had filling left over he was allowed seeing as it was a long time til dinner! After dinner everyone else had apple cake and custard but hubby asked for more Eccles Cakes. I had to put the rest in a box to hide from him!

Well I don’t think I’ll be baking hubby a cake for his next birthday, he can have a giant Eccles Cake instead with a candle stuck in the middle of it! He has asked if I’ll make them again at Christmas, maybe I could try a version with cranberries in it.

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx

Cheese? Yes Please! Cooking with Pilgrim’s Choice Cheddar.

A couple of weeks back I was contacted by Pilgrim’s Choice to see if I would be interested in trying out some of their cheeses and to use them in my baking and cooking.  I was only too happy to agree as we love eating and cooking with cheese in our house.

So I was sent a voucher for two large packs of cheese which I took along to my local Sainsbury’s when I was doing my weekly shop and chose two sorts of cheddar. To be honest this was the only variety of Pilgrim’s Choice cheese available in my nearest Sainsburys but this was perfect to fit around what I would be able to cook and use with my family.  It was great to think about how I could use the cheese.  I tried to think of as many different ways of using it as possible.  Also, I love to see how far I can make products go using a minimum of waste or money.  Many thanks to Pilgrim’s Choice for giving me the opportunity to try out their cheese.  I know there are many more varieties to taste which I do hope to try out in the future!

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Although I was keen to get started, it wasn’t until the following weekend that I actually got started on my “Cheesy Challenge”.  I was very busy at work and it was very tempting to hack into the cheese and just use it for sandwiches.  Though you can’t beat a gorgeous mature cheddar and pickle sandwich! But that wasn’t the point, I had to think and be creative.  My friends on Facebook and Twitter came up with some great suggestions and my mouth started watering, especially at the thought of baking cheese scones!

Here is what I did get round to cooking with my delicious Pilgrim’s Choice cheese:

One Sunday lunch we had a large bacon, leek and cheese quiche served with the mature Pilgrim’s Choice cheddar.  This had new potatoes and salad with it.  The following day we sneaked the leftovers for lunch. I adapted Holly Bell’s “Man Quiche” recipe from her fabulous book “Recipes From A Normal Mum”,

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To make a Bacon, Leek and Cheddar version of Holly Bell’s Man Quiche I grated some Pilgrim’s Choice mature cheddar and added it to the quiche filling. This went really well with the leeks, bacon, tarragon and double cream.
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The uncooked “Man Quiche” about to go into the oven to be baked.
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The cooked Man Quiche.

I love using cheese as part of a snacky lunch on a cold winter’s day.  I was on my own one Saturday lunchtime and wanted something comforting, yet filling. I had some leeks still to use up after the quiche and knew they went well with cheese so thought I’d try and put them in my cheese on toast lunch.

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I softened some leeks using some Frylight spray in a small saucepan.
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I grated some Lighter Pilgrim’s choice cheese and added it to a beaten egg in a mixing bowl.
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The cheese and leek mixture was spooned onto a couple of pieces of toast and put under the grill to melt.
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The Cheese and leeks on toast was absolutely delicious and kept me warm. It was very filling and I really enjoyed my Saturday lunch.

I was absolutely rubbish at my Home Economics classes at secondary school, such a long time ago back in the 1980s!  But one dish I remember cooking was a very economical Cheese and Potato Pie.  You mixed cooked mashed potato with grated cheese and put it in a dish on top of a layer of baked beans.  This was then put in the oven and cooked until crispy.  I loved this meal and made it a lot when I was single and also as a student as it was so cheap to cook.  I decided to cook it one Wednesday evening as it had been a busy day at work and I didn’t have much left in the fridge.  I cooked it with some gorgeous bacon from the local farm shop and my children absolutely loved it.  My daughter asked me why I didn’t cook the Cheese and Potato Pie more often.  I don’t know why but I need to cook it more often, there were clean plates all round!

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Cooked creamy mashed potato to which I added grated Pilgrim’s Choice lighter cheddar.
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A layer of baked beans was added to the bottom of the pie dish.
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Grated cheese being added to the mashed potato.
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The Cheese and Potato Pie was baked in the oven for about 30 minutes or until the top became all crunchy and crispy.
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The cheese and potato pie served with a couple of rashers of crispy bacon.

My final bake with the Pilgrim’s Choice Mature Cheddar was by making these absolutely massive Cheese Scones. The recipe I used was adapted from one of Paul Hollywood‘s recipes.  It should have been a Cheese and Chive Scone recipe but I added paprika instead of chives and made the scones twice as big as they should have been.  They contained a chopped red onion too and gave the scones a delicious sweet taste to them.  I baked them last Tuesday during half term week for us to have instead of a piece of bread or a roll with some soup at lunchtime.  I discovered that they tasted much better warm, slathered with butter and were at their best when they were totally fresh.  My daughter and I loved them but my son wasn’t so keen on them.

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My enormous Cheddar Cheese and Onion scones based on a Paul Hollywood recipe.
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Cut in half and waiting for some butter to go on top of them. Just delicious!

I was very impressed with the two large packs of Pilgrim’s Choice cheese I used.  The packs were resealable and kept well in my fridge.  I know I will buy more in the future as the large packs were tremendous value and were perfect for my family and our needs.

Happy Cooking!

Love Sam xx

Promotion! 25% off Tickets for the BBC Cakes And Bakes Show- October 2014!

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Last week I was delighted to get an email from BBC Good Food asking if I would like to run a promotion on my blog.  As I have recently been to the Good Food Show in Harrogate and really enjoyed it I was excited to see there’s going to be a Bakes And Cakes Show in London this October.  I was planning on going along anyway as it ties in with half term week but even more exciting, I’ve been asked to run a promotion as a keen baking blogger.

The Good Food Bakes and Cakes Show will be held between 25th and 27th October 2014 at The Business Design Centre in Islington.  I’ve been given a promotional code which you can use to get your 25% off the entry ticket to the show.  I’m really looking forward to going and maybe I might get chance to meet up with you!

If you want to find out more about The Bakes And Cakes Show there is lots more information on their website :

http://www.bbcgoodfoodbakesandcakesshow.com/

Also, if you want to keep up to date with any other offers or things that are happening at the show, there is a link to a Newsletter you can sign up to if you want, more details here.

In the meantime, here is some information I was given about the BBC Good Food Bakes and Cakes Show to whet your appetite!  I can’t wait myself, especially as there’s going to be a whole host of baking heroes/ heroines there such as Mary Berry, Paul Hollywood and John Whaite!

The BBC Good Food Bakes & Cakes Show, sponsored by Lexus, launches at the beautiful Business Design Centre in Islington, London from 25-27 October 2014. Bringing the popular BBC Good Food Bakes & Cakes title to life, the show will be packed with baking, bread-making and cake-crafting demonstrations, free master classes, and hundreds of products to get you baking like a pro.

PLUS! Don’t miss out on seeing your favourite baking stars, LIVE at the show! Every full day adult ticket includes a seat for the Bakes & Cakes Theatre, where you can watch Mary Berry, Mich Turner, John Whaite, Paul Hollywood, and other expert bakers in LIVE 30 minute baking and technique demos.

Whether you’re new to baking or a seasoned baking veteran, the BBC Good Food Bakes & Cakes Show is the perfect place to meet bakers, cake-crafters and confectioners, learn new skills, and pick up all the essentials you need to develop your home baking hobby.

Tickets are now on sale! Just quote EBPAR1 when purchasing to receive 25% off tickets or Click here!

Looking forward to seeing you there!  Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx

Rum Babas from The Great British Bake Off -Showstopper Bakes.

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Last year when the Great British Bake Off was on I was tempted by the Rum Babas that the contestants were asked to make for their Technical Challenge in the very first week. Who can remember John Whaite accidentally putting salt in the rum babas instead of sugar because the glass jars weren’t labelled?  Luckily though it worked out for him in the end becoming the series winner! I was keen to try out making rum babas, they are something I think of as a 1970’s dessert trolley invention.  I had only tasted a rum baba once, about three years ago when my hubby bought one.  It was stale and tasted funny.  I only had one mouthful of it which is rare for someone like me who is a sugar addict!

To make the rum babas you need some small savarin moulds, these are the ones I bought last year in Lakeland: http://www.lakeland.co.uk/16019/4-Small-Savarin-Rings

I noticed that Lakeland started stocking them after the Bake Off had been on which is great. They came in packs of 4. They have also started stocking the silicone chocolate dome moulds which are for making the chocolate teacakes which were another very tricky technical challenge bake from Series 3.  As a regular shopper at my local stores (either Harrogate, York or Northallerton) I was pleased as I knew my hubby would want me to try them.

But did I get round to using them? No I didn’t! Well over a year later I had forgotten about the moulds and found them in my cupboard still in the packaging.  Guilt overcame me and I thought I must try them out as promised.  My hubby talked about rum babas saying he would love to have one for pudding.  We had rum, I had yeast so I decided to get baking.

Last Sunday morning was a quiet day at home at the beginning of half term week.  I had all day to spend on the rum babas between other jobs but there was lots to do.  I’m still underconfident when it comes to anything involving yeast.

Here’s how it was made and what happened:

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First, flour, sugar, yeast and salt were put in a large bowl. They were put at different sides to one another.
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A beaten egg in the measuring jug.
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The dry ingredients are gently mixed together, then the egg was poured into the same bowl.
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The eggs were mixed in with the dry ingredients to form a wet dough.
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The wet dough was placed in my Kitchen Aid mixer bowl and mixed on a very slow setting for 8-10 minutes with a dough hook.
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After the kneading time.

At this point I began to panic.  The dough was very wet and I really struggled to knead it by hand.  In the end I had to stick it in the mixer as I just couldn’t work with it.  It just stuck to my hands and the more I tried to knead, the more it stuck.  I don’t know if I was meant to use the mixer but I thought it would be better than my hot hands touching the dough.  I managed to get it into the bowl, I washed my hands and then tried to search on YouTube to see if they had the original episode where they made the rum babas.  Then I could watch it back and see where I was going wrong.  Lo and behold there was a clip showing the rum babas and it was mentioned that the dough did appear wet.  Thank heavens for that!

If you want to see the original clip, then here is the link to it here:

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The dough was placed in my Utility room on the work surface. The bowl was covered in cling film. I chose the utility room as I had the tumble dryer on and the room was quite warm at the time.

After all this messing about my kitchen surface looked like a scene of destruction.  It took some scrubbing to get the dough of the surface, it felt stickier than Superglue, if that’s possible!  I left the dough to rise in the bowl for about an hour and a half which was enough time for me to get on with the ironing.

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Here are the 4 savarin moulds bought from Lakeland.
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The moulds were lightly greased with flour and a sprinkling of caster sugar.
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The dough was meant to be piped carefully into the savarin moulds, taking care that each one held an equal amount of mixture.  I spooned it in with a teaspoon and wondered why it was so messy!

Then for a second proving, this time in the savarin moulds. They had to rise to the level of the hole but not be too overproved.  This was easier said than done!

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After baking, I turned the rum babas out onto a mat to cool down. Before they were fully cooled I needed to soak them with the rum sugar syrup.
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Each rum baba was so big it only just fitted inside my dessert bowls.
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Here is the cream mixture all whipped up. I swear by the Get A Grip piping bags from Lakeland. To help me fill these bags easily I use a pint glass to support the bag.
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Each rum baba got a swirl of cream piped in the middle of it and was then topped with some berries. I used blueberries and strawberries but I reckon chopped kiwi fruit would look pretty too!
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All ready for our pudding! What a massive rum baba as well. We all really enjoyed them and our eyes were bigger than our stomachs!

So, would I make the rum babas again?  Yes, I would.  Despite them being quite labour intensive in short bursts they were a massive hit with the family and a perfect treat.  Very naughty but nice!

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx

Paul’s English Muffins , The Technical Bake From The Great British Bake Off Series 4

I was really excited to be watching episode 2 of The Great British Bake Off.  We’re beginning to get to know the faces of the contestants of this new series and what they are capable of.  As Week 2 was bread week and one area of baking I really struggle with, I was glued to the TV to see if I could pick up any tips or advice.  The breadsticks looked amazing and my mouth was watering at the thought of a pile of breadsticks washed down with a large glass of red wine. I had to make do with a cup of tea and I had already had my dinner.   I was totally gobsmacked by the over-the-top bakes of the showstopper bread.  It seems as if they are doing really taxing things this year and upping their game. I’m sorry to say this but I wasn’t impressed by the Octopus football bread . However I was amazed by all Kimberley’s bakes and was very surprised when she wasn’t made Star Baker.  Ruby though did extremely well and I was pleased to see her being recognised for all her efforts.  It was sad to see Lucy go, though. I thought she could have got further in the competition.

So, the technical bake for this week was English Muffins. As it was a bread bake it would be one of Paul Hollywood’s recipes.  I had to explain this to my children that I meant the sort of muffins you had at McDonalds with bacon and egg for breakfast, not ones with chocolate chips in!  I for one love English Muffins and my favourite dish on the menu at Betty’s in Harrogate is their delicious Eggs Benedict. So, I thought I would try it out on Saturday to see how I got on.  I was dreading it.

So on Saturday morning, my hubby was out working and the kids were still in bed (well they are teenagers!) I decided to get on with it so we could have the Eggs Benedict for lunch.  I always make a mess of Hollandaise sauce though, so I cheated and bought a jar of it from Tesco. I wish I hadn’t though, the list of additives on the label was shocking!  It was a Finest one but even that had glucose-fructose syrup in it? Why?  Totally not necessary but because I’d ordered it as part of an online shop I hadn’t checked the ingredients list first, yuck!

Strong white bread flour, yeast and salt are put into a large mixing bowl.
Strong white bread flour, yeast and salt are put into a large mixing bowl.
Sugar, small pieces of butter, a beaten egg and some mlik at room temperature are added to the bowl.
Sugar, small pieces of butter, a beaten egg and some mlik at room temperature are added to the bowl.
The dough is mixed together by working it with your hand.
The dough is mixed together by working it with your hand.
The dough is made into a big ball and kneaded for about 10 minutes.
The dough is made into a big ball and kneaded for about 10 minutes.
After kneading the dough is put in an oiled bowl, covered in cling film and left to rise on the worktop.
After kneading the dough is put in an oiled bowl, covered in cling film and left to rise on the worktop.

At this stage I thought I would get the kettle on and make myself a cuppa.  It was great to sit down for 5 minutes before the kids surfaced.  I didn’t get much time for sitting down as there was washing to hang out and some  ironing to get on with.  Why is it that on a day when I try out a Technical Bake, it ends up being a day where you have loads to do?

After about 1 1/2 hours the muffin dough was doubled in size.
After about 1 1/2 hours the muffin dough was doubled in size.
The dough is rolled out to a 1.5cm thickness and left on the worktop to relax for 1/4 hour.
The dough is rolled out to a 1.5cm thickness and left on the worktop to relax for 1/4 hour.
Some semolina was tipped onto a baking sheet and the muffins were dipped in this.
Some semolina was tipped onto a baking sheet and the muffins were dipped in this.

At this stage my hubby got in from work. He had been out to get a few jobs done that he needed to catch up with and came in absolutely starving.   I said if he wanted the dinner a bit quicker he could poach the eggs for me while I did the muffins.  He agreed to this thankfully as his poached eggs are sublime! This is the bit where I wanted it all to go right as when you make something for the first time, especially when you are making it for your family, you want it to go right.

The muffins are cooked in a griddle pan for about 6 or so minutes.
The muffins are cooked in a griddle pan for about 6 or so minutes.
Cooking the muffins on the other side.
Cooking the muffins on the other side.
Eight Muffins all ready to be split in half, toasted and eaten.
Eight Muffins all ready to be split in half, toasted and eaten.]

Fortunately, the muffins turned out really well. I’m not sure if they would be Great British Bake Off standard but I was pleased with them. If my family eat the lot, then that to me speaks volumes!

Two halves of a muffin to make one of my all time favourite meals- Eggs Benedict!
Two halves of a muffin to make one of my all time favourite meals- Eggs Benedict!

This is a Technical Bake I would definitely try again for a winter Sunday teatime if I have enough time to make them.

If you bake English Muffins, it would be great to know how you get on with them.

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx

Chocolate Tea Cakes- Great British Bake Off Series 3

I’ve always loved Tunnock’s Teacakes.  To be honest I don’t usually buy packets of chocolate biscuits when I do my weekly food shop as I know once that packet is open, I’ll trough the lot!  I did buy them when my children were at primary school and took packed lunches.  We all love them in our house, so when we do buy a packet of teacakes, it’s a real treat.

In series 3 of the Great British Bake Off last summer the Technical Challenge in Biscuit Week was to make Chocolate Teacakes!  I was excited to see this as they have always been a mystery about how you went about making them.  As I had bought the book to accompany the last series How To Turn Everyday Bakes Into Showstoppers, I had the recipe but had absolutely no confidence in making them.  Who can forget the lovely Cathryn and her famous catchphrase “Oh my giddy aunt!” every time something went wrong in the Bake Off tent.  I also loved her comment “I can’t serve Mary Berry green carpet!”  Cathryn was a joy to watch on the TV, her bakes were stunning but the chocolate teacakes and the other biscuit bakes led to her leaving the show.

It has taken me a year to have a go at baking the teacakes for a couple of reasons, mainly because I thought I couldn’t do it and also due to them being time consuming. It wasn’t until I went into my local Lakeland Limited shop in Harrogate and found out that they have started to sell the silicone chocolate moulds that you need to make these gorgeous treats!

To find out more about the Lakeland silicone moulds click here

 

This is what the silicone chocolate teacake mould looks like-photo courtesy of Lakeland’s website.

Last Wednesday my husband was away working up in Scotland.  I was spending a day catching up on jobs and errands but decided once and for all I was going to get on with making these teacakes. I knew I was in for a tricky time but I thought if I followed the instructions carefully then I might be ok.

The chocolate slicone teacake mould was washed out and wiped with a kitchen towel.
The chocolate slicone teacake mould was washed out and wiped with a kitchen towel.
300g plain chocolate were melted carefully in the microwave.  It was meant to cool slightly to stiffen up. It took ages to do this.
300g plain chocolate were melted carefully in the microwave. It was meant to cool slightly to stiffen up. It took ages to do this.
While the chocolate was cooling I made the biscuit base, this was made with wholemeal flour, plain flour, butter, caster sugar and golden syrup to bind it together. The biscuits were very short in texture and kept crumbling. It took all my effort to roll and re-roll the dough to get 6 cookies out of it!
While the chocolate was cooling I made the biscuit base, this was made with wholemeal flour, plain flour, butter and caster sugar. The binding was done with a tablespoon of milk which didn’t work too well!  The biscuits were very short in texture and kept crumbling. It took all my effort to roll and re-roll the dough to get 6 cookies out of it!
The melted chocolate is spooned carefully into the mould and spread around to make the dome part of the chocolate teacake.  The chocolate was still far too runny and kept running down to the bottom of the mould! I kept spooning it back and trying to coat the edge of the moulds.
The melted chocolate is spooned carefully into the mould and spread around to make the dome part of the chocolate teacake. The chocolate was still far too runny and kept running down to the bottom of the mould! I kept spooning it back and trying to coat the edge of the moulds.
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Once the biscuit bases were out of the oven they were covered in the remains of the melted chocolate and left to set. This bit seemed easier than the dome bit but I did struggle with it as I was hungry and could have happily wolfed the biscuits down there and then!

While all the chocolate was setting I had a go at making the marshmallow filling. I have never, ever made marshmallow before and began to get worried once I saw the method. It involved heating the egg whites, golden syrup and salt in a pan rather like an Italian meringue. You needed to add a vanilla pod but I didn’t have one, so a splash of vanilla extract went in here instead.  The one and only time I made Italian meringue to make a topping for lemon meringue cupcakes resulted in me burning my thumb when the meringue splashed on me. I still have a scar about 1cm long 2 years later! I opted for another method, mixing it all in the KitchenAid with my balloon whisk. It seemed to work ok.

By this time it was far too late to be baking. The chocolate in the mould still hadn’t set and I was tired. I thought I would leave it until the morning and assemble the teacakes in the morning when I got up!

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Next morning! The teacakes were assembled. The marshmallow filling was put inside the domes with a tablespoon then the edges of the biscuits were piped with more melted chocolate.
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After a couple of hours I attempted to get out the teacakes out of the mould! As the chocolate in the dome part wasn’t thick enough, only one turned out intact! They also had this horrible streak on the chocolate, not sure what that is as I am not a chocolate expert.
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And here are the rejects! Only suitable to be eaten with a spoon and from a bowl. You could hardly put a foil wrapper around these!

Well, was it worth the effort?  I’m so sorry to say but no it wasn’t. I found the recipe far too fiddly and time consuming.  I will stick to buying Tunnocks as normal!

Here is a link to the recipe if you are brave enough to have a go at making your own chocolate tea cakes:

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/chocolate_marshmallow_60410

Happy Baking!

Love Sam xx